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Budget Kitchen Remodeling: 5 Money-Saving Steps

Budget Kitchen Remodeling: 5 Money-Saving Steps

Can’t afford an entire kitchen remodel in one fell swoop? You can complete the work in 5 budget-saving stages (and still cook dinner during the down time).

Stage one: Start with a complete design plan


Your plan should be comprehensive and detailed — everything from the location of the refrigerator to which direction the cabinet doors will open to whether you need a spice drawer.
To save time (and money) during tear-out and construction, plan on using your existing walls and kitchen configuration. That’ll keep plumbing and electrical systems mostly intact, and you won’t have the added expense — and mess — of tearing out walls.
Joseph Feinberg, vice president of Allied Kitchen and Bath in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., recommends hiring a professional designer, such as an architect or a certified kitchen designer, who can make sure the details of your plans are complete. You’ll pay about 10% of the total project for a pro designer, but you’ll save a whole bunch of headaches that would likely cost as much — or more — to fix. Plus, a pro is likely to offer smart solutions you hadn’t thought of.
For a nominal fee, you also can get design help from a major home improvement store. However, you’ll be expected to purchase some of your cabinets and appliances from that store.

  • Key strategies: Once your plans are set, you can hold onto them until you’re ready to remodel.
  • Time frame: 3-6 months

 

Stage two: Order the cabinets, appliances, and lighting fixtures

 
Cabinets  and appliances are the biggest investments in your kitchen remodeling  project. If you’re remodeling in stages, you can order them any time  after the plans are complete and store them in a garage (away from  moisture) or in a spare room until you’re ready to pull the trigger on  the installation.
Remember that it may take 4-6 weeks from the day you order them for your cabinets to be delivered.  If  you can’t afford all new appliances, keep your old ones for now — but  plan to buy either the same sizes, or choose larger sizes and design  your cabinets around those larger measurements. You can replace  appliances as budget permits later on.
The same goes for your lighting fixtures: If you can live with your old ones for now, you’ll save money by reusing them.
You’ll  have to decide about flooring, too — one of the trickier decisions to  make because it also affects how and when you install cabinets.
You’ll  need to know if your old flooring runs underneath your cabinets, or if  the flooring butts up against the cabinet sides and toe kicks. If the  flooring runs underneath, you’ll have some leeway for new cabinet  configurations — just be sure the old flooring will cover any newly  exposed floor areas. Here are points to remember:

  • Keep old flooring for cost savings. This works if your new cabinets  match your old layout, so that the new cabinets fit exactly into the old  flooring configuration. If the existing flooring runs underneath your  cabinets and covers all flooring area, then any new cabinet  configuration will be fine.
  • Keep your old flooring for now and cover it or replace it later.  Again, this works if your cabinet configuration is identical to the old  layout.

However, if you plan to cover your old flooring or tear it out and  replace it at some point in the future, remember that your new flooring  might raise the height of your floor, effectively lowering your cabinet  height.
For thin new floor coverings, such as vinyl and linoleum,  the change is imperceptible. For thicker floorings, such as wood and  tile, you might want to take into account the change in floor height by  installing your new cabinets on shims.

  • Key strategy: Keep old appliances, lighting fixtures, and flooring and use them until you can afford new ones.
  • Time frame: 2-3 weeks

Stage three: Gut the kitchen and do the electrical and plumbing work

 
Here’s   where the remodel gets messy. Old cabinetry and appliances are  removed,  and walls may have to be opened up for new electrical  circuits. Keep in  close contact with your contractor during this stage so you can answer questions and clear up any problems   quickly. A major kitchen remodel can take 6 to 10 weeks, depending on   how extensive the project is.
During this stage, haul your refrigerator, microwave, and toaster oven to another room — near the laundry or the garage, for example — so you’ve got the means to cook meals. Feinberg suggests tackling this stage in the summer, when you can easily grill and eat outside. That’ll reduce the temptation to eat at restaurants, and will help keep your day-to-day costs under control.

  • Key strategies: Encourage your contractor to expedite the   tear-out and installation of new systems. Plan a makeshift kitchen while   the work is progressing. Schedule this work for summer when you can   grill and eat outside.
  • Time frame: 6-10 weeks

Stage four: Install cabinets, countertop, appliances, flooring, and fixtures

If   you’ve done your homework and bought key components in advance, you   should roll through this phase. You’ve now got a (mostly) finished   kitchen.
A high-end countertop and backsplash can be a sizable sum of money. If you can’t quite swing   it, put down a temporary top, such as painted marine plywood or   inexpensive laminate. Later, you can upgrade to granite, tile, solid surface, or marble.

  • Key strategy: Install an inexpensive countertop; upgrade when you’re able.
  • Time frame: 1-2 weeks

Final phases: Upgrade if necessary

Replace the inexpensive countertop, pull up the laminate flooring, and put in tile or hardwood, or buy that new refrigerator you wanted but couldn’t afford during the remodel. (Just make sure it fits in the space!)

By: on September 7th, 2012 Category: Home Improvement, Home Selling Tips, Real Estate News Tags: , , ,